Is Your Allergy Causing Your Hearing Loss?

Unless you’re very lucky or live like a hermit, you’re probably going to get at least one cold a year. However, if you experience a cold that lasts longer than 2 weeks, this can be a sign of something more serious. You’re likely familiar with some of the complications that your common cold can turn into, like bronchitis. But did you know that colds can come along with hearing loss-like symptoms?

Hearing Loss After a Cold Is a Clue

A cold can have an effect in your ears. You’ve probably experienced a minor hearing loss when you have a cold; it’s actually quite common, but in some cases it may be a symptom of a more serious problem. If your hearing is imapired after a cold for several days, then it’s time to seek professional help, specifically an otorhinolaryngologist.

Your ears, nose and throat are closely connected, and an infection in any of the three makes your hearing feel a little muffled. The ear is a very complex and delicate system, and an inflammation caused by an infection can interfere with the way it picks up vobrations that your brain interprets as sounds.

A cold may cause a fluid build up in the middle ear. The congestion may also lead to a bacterial or viral ear infection, which in turn can have a more serious effect in you middle or inner ear.

Do Allergies Have The Same Effect?

If you’re getting frequent colds with stuffed-up ears and other symptoms, like nasal congestion, it’s possible that your issue isn’t the cold virus, but an allergy.

An allergy, like a cold, can have also cause sensorineural hearing loss, among other unpleasant symptoms. At the very least, you should visit your primary care physician if you are experiencing an allergy, or ask your doctor for a referral to an allergist.

This may seem like a little thing, but you should know your options and you don’t have to live with hearing loss, especially when there’s an obvious cause. If your hearing issues are caused by an allergy, you should find out. Allergies can be miserable when they’re untreated, but with a proper diagnosis, you’ll find it much easier to manage.