Congenital Cytomegalovirus: Early Hearing Loss

hearing loss caused by congenital cytomegalovirus

Research says that hearing loss caused by congenital cytomegalovirus is a significant problem. This virus is one of the major causes of hearing issues in young children.

Congenital means that children were born with this virus. In essence, Cytomegalovirus is passed through the placenta from an infected mother.

Why It Is Difficult to Recognize Hearing Loss Caused by Congenital Cytomegalovirus

Congenital cytomegalovirus can be asymptomatic or symptomatic.

Asymptomatic means that there are no apparent effects on the child at birth. For example, this virus may only start impacting a child’s health at school age.

Symptomatic congenital cytomegalovirus is rarer. Hearing loss is one of the symptoms, but it also comes with muscle weakness and eye problems. Liver problems and jaundice are common as well.

Hearing loss caused by congenital cytomegalovirus is gradual. It happens in the inner ear in one or both ears. This damage can go from mild to severe very easily.

When a child has asymptomatic cytomegalovirus, it can take their parents a long time to notice that anything is wrong.

Prevention and Treatment of Congenital Cytomegalovirus

Cytomegalovirus infections are difficult to avoid. After all, this virus is everywhere and spreads by touch. Still, doctors advise pregnant women to avoid contact with children younger than two and a half, when possible.

In many cases, pregnant women experience no symptoms, so they don’t know that they passed the virus on to the fetus. Hence some doctors believe that widespread screenings for congenital cytomegalovirus are crucial. Early screenings could help decrease the severity of hearing loss in infected children.

It’s important to recognize hearing loss caused by congenital cytomegalovirus as soon as possible. Antiviral treatments can help mitigate the damage caused by cytomegalovirus. Additionally, children may benefit from hearing aids or professional support.