Can a Swimmer’s Ear Infection Result in Hearing Loss?

swimmer’s ear infection can result in temporary hearing loss

If you’ve ever engaged in recreational water play, odds are you’ve gotten swimmer’s ear at least once in your life. It’s usually more of a nuisance than anything else. But, a swimmer’s ear infection can result in temporary hearing loss.

Swimmer’s ear is just one of four types of ear infections you can get. And, though it’s called “swimmer’s ear,” anyone can get it. And if you live in the right climate, it can increase your risk.

This infection involves the outer ear, rather than the middle ear like other ear infections. And a hot and humid climate can make it worse, allowing moisture to build up and become trapped in the ear. Additionally, swimmer’s ear is technically a skin infection, not an ear infection.

Swimmer’s ear is technically a skin infection because the skin of the ear canal is infected. Not the ear itself. Though that doesn’t make it any less painful. Or potentially harmful to your hearing.

And, like many other infections of the ear, it can also result in temporary hearing loss. While you have the infection, noises may sound muffled due to the excess fluid and swelling that blocks off the ear canal. The good news is that hearing returns to normal after about a week.

However, this is contingent on seeking proper treatment for the infection. Usually, a doctor will prescribe antibacterial drops for the ear. The pain subsides after a few days of treatment, and the infection after about a week and a half after that.

Finally, if you get swimmer’s ear frequently, and do not seek treatment, the bacterial infection can lead to more serious complications. The infection itself is common and not serious. But, it can become serious if not treated.

Final Thoughts

Swimmer’s ear infection can result in temporary hearing loss, but it is not a serious infection. Especially, if you seek treatment promptly. But, if you are prone to ignoring the infection it can lead to serious complications.